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Street artists have taken over an empty house in Clapham


A Case Study of a House, ZOER, 2020 (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/Nick Smith Photos)

An empty house in Clapham has been taken over by street artists.

The Victorian townhouse, which is currently under renovation, has been transformed by a number of talented creatives – with different individuals taking over various rooms.

Packed with pandemic-inspired works, the house boasts a variety of interesting features from the vomit emoji and Clap For Carers wallpaper to ‘tattooed’ rubber gloves hanging on the wall.

The project is part of the disCONNECT exhibition, which brings artists together from around the world to explore both the physical and psychological impact of the pandemic.

Mr Cenz ‘s installation (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/Nick Smith)

A series of miniatures by Spanish artist Isaac Cordal can be found dotted throughout the house, each one acting as a gentle reminder of the images associated with the pandemic (think masked people, a socially distanced couple and a man in his dressing gown).

One of Isaac Cordal’s miniatures (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/ Ian Cox)
David Bray’s work (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/Nick Smith)

London artist Aida Wilde has turned the bathroom into a ‘pandemic mausoleum,’ by covering the walls and floor with provocative slogans such as ‘99% of us are in this together’ and ‘keep calm and occupy a mansion’.

The room also boasts everyday cleaning objects – such as bleach and toilet rolls – which summarise the past few months.

Aida Wilde’s installation (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/Ian Cox)
ZOER’s piece (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/Nick Smith)

The kitchen installation, by Icy and Sot, is called Socialism vs Capitalism and combines tables, plates and cutlery which form a tabletop – a work which aims to reflect the effects of capitalism on those from poorer backgrounds.

Socialism vs Capitalism, Icy and Sot, 2020 (Picture: disCONNECT, Schoeni Projects London/Nick Smith)
Aida Wilde’s work (Picture: disCONNECT, at Schoeni Projects London/Nick Smith)

Each installation has a plethora of digital resources which come with it, including online videos, virtual tours and Instagram Live interviews – so there’s lots to get stuck into.

Members of the public are also encouraged to submit their own artworks for potential inclusion.

New contemporary arts platform Schoeni Projects is behind the exhibition, which is open to visitors by appointment – but can also be viewed online. 

It’s set to run for one month, from 24 July – 24 August, before moving to Hong Kong.

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