THE world’s first ever male birth control injection that is administered into genitals is nearly ready after the injection successfully passed its clinical trial.

The birth control method, which lasts approximately 13 years, involves injecting a polymer which effectively blocks sperm from leaving the testicles.

 The vaccine, preceded by a dose of local anaesthesia, is designed to replace a traditional vasectomy

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The vaccine, preceded by a dose of local anaesthesia, is designed to replace a traditional vasectomyCredit: Getty – Contributor

The Indian Council of Medical Research, a government-funded biomedical research agency, has successfully completed a clinical trial on an injectable male contraceptive, the Hindustan Times reported.

Dr R.S. Sharma, senior scientist with ICMR, said: “The product is ready, with only regulatory approvals pending (from the government).

“The trials are over, including extended, Phase 3 clinical trials for which 303 candidates were recruited with a 97.3 per cent success rate and no reported side effects.

“The product can safely be called the world’s first male contraceptive.”

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The vaccine, preceded by a dose of local anaesthesia, is designed to replace a traditional vasectomy.

Researchers in the US have developed a similar contraceptive, called Vasalgel, which has not yet been brought to market.

A male birth control pill also exists, though researchers anticipate it’ll be about 10 years before it makes it to market.

The product can safely be called the world’s first male contraceptive

Dr R.S. SharmaSenior scientist with ICMR

Drugs such as these can only prevent pregnancy, but do not protect against STDs.

Dr Sharma added: “The polymer was developed by Professor S.K. Guha from the Indian Institute of Technology in the 1970s.

“ICMR has been researching on it to turn it into a product for mass use since 1984, and the final product is ready after exhaustive trials.”

Researchers call this reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance.

V.G. Somani, Medicine Controller General of India, said that because of pending regulatory approval, the injection “will still take about six to seven months … before the product can be manufactured.”

It comes as Vice asked several Indian men if they were open to the idea of a shot in the groin to prevent pregnancy.

Many agreed that more options would be a boon for men and women, though many weren’t keen on needling their nether regions.

A version of this story originally appeared on New York Post.


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