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UFO sighting: Phoenix Lights 2.0 seen over Colombia – claim


The Phoenix Lights Incident became a phenomenon from March 13, 1997, after thousands of people began telling of seeing huge triangular UFOs drifting over Arizona and the city of Phoenix. There has never been an official explanation for the sighting, with some claiming it was a military exercise while others believe it was a UFO. Now, some claim Colombia has its own “Phoenix Lights Incident” to worry about after a stream of bright lights appeared over the city of Medellin.

So many people spotted the incident over the capital of Colombia that it made the news, with a UFO expert, Juan Jesús Vallejo, told the Al Rojo Vivo program: “[The objects] move in an intelligent and coordinated manner. This sighting lasted a long time.”

The sighting was picked up by self-proclaimed UFO expert Scott C Waring, who said aliens are attempting to make themselves known to the people of Earth.

Mr Waring wrote on his blog UFO Sightings Daily: “Anther Phoenix Lights incident just happened in Medallin, Colombia.

“Residents were witnesses to an event that lasted a long time and the lights changed colour and sometimes organized into a group.

“This is absolute proof that aliens are still trying to make the public aware of their existence. An effort on their part is being made.”

However, the first thing that springs to mind when looking at the stream of lights is that it may be the Starlink constellation.

Starlink is SpaceX’s ambitious yet controversial plan to launch 12,000 satellites into Earth’s orbit, with the aim of supplying internet to every corner of the globe.

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The first of the 12,000 satellites were launched in May 2019, and month by month Elon Musk’s firm has steadily been increasing its numbers in the skies

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“Firstly, the surfaces of these satellites are often made of highly reflective metal, and reflections from the Sun in the hours after sunset and before sunrise make them appear as slow-moving dots in the night sky.

“Although most of these reflections may be so faint that they are hard to pick out with the naked eye, they can be detrimental to the sensitive capabilities of large ground-based astronomical telescopes, including the extreme wide-angle survey telescopes currently under construction.

“Secondly, despite notable efforts to avoid interfering with radio astronomy frequencies, aggregate radio signals emitted from the satellite constellations can still threaten astronomical observations at radio wavelengths.

“Recent advances in radio astronomy, such as producing the first image of a black hole or understanding more about the formation of planetary systems, were only possible through concerted efforts in safeguarding the radio sky from interference.”





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