Travel

Most beautiful islands in the world – with no coronavirus cases


NEARLY every country in the world has reported cases of coronavirus, as more than 1.4 million people are infected worldwide.

However, some smaller islands have somehow managed to avoid the virus.

 A holiday on a tropical island is popular with British families
A holiday on a tropical island is popular with British familiesCredit: Getty Images – Getty

The UK has banned all non-essential travel indefinitely, meaning a holiday at the moment isn’t advised against.

Instead, Brits are instead looking to the future, with many looking to book holidays next year.

Sandy beaches, clear water and un-touristy resorts are some of the most common requests for trips abroad, with many of these islands offering just that.

From Greece to Polynesia, here are some of the most beautiful islands in the world – without coronavirus.

Santorini

 Santorini has managed to avoid coronavirus
Santorini has managed to avoid coronavirusCredit: Getty Images – Getty

Santorini is one of the most popular Greek holiday islands – and is one of the few to have avoided coronavirus.

While other islands and part of the mainland are reporting cases of the virus, the iconic white-and-blue paradise has not been affected yet, and has shut down travel to try and prevent it.

The island is popular with honeymooners, with a number of package deals and cheap flights for British tourists.

Palau

 Palau has also managed to avoid coronavirus - although it isn't the easiest to visit
Palau has also managed to avoid coronavirus – although it isn’t the easiest to visitCredit: Getty Images – Getty

Located between Guam and the Philippines, the 340 islands of Palau have managed to avoid coronavirus with no confirmed cases.

The island is popular with divers, as well as honeymooners looking to explore the volcanic islands surrounded by a barrier reef

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It’s not the easiest to get to – you’ll have to get to Seoul, Manila or Guam first to fly there.

Tuvalu

 Tuvalu, one of the least visited islands in the world, welcomed Prince William and Kate Middleton in 2012
Tuvalu, one of the least visited islands in the world, welcomed Prince William and Kate Middleton in 2012Credit: Getty Images – Getty

The Polynesian island of Tuvalu, found between Australia and Hawaii, is one of the smallest nations in the world, with just 11,000 locals.

It is also one of the least visited places on the planet, although lucky tourists who have travelled by the twice weekly flights often go diving or cave exploring.

The flights aren’t for the faint-hearted, with the only runway also being a main road used by locals, and only an air siren used to tell them to leave during landing.

Tonga

 Tonga is known to be one of the friendliest islands
Tonga is known to be one of the friendliest islandsCredit: Getty Images – Getty

To the south of Tuvalu is Tonga – another Polynesian island near Fiji yet to be affected by the coronavirus crisis.

It has been dubbed the “Friendly Island” by western tourists, after Captain James Cook claimed he was warmly welcomed when landing in 1773.

Kayaking and yachting are popular activities, or learning the popular paddle dance, called me’etu’upaki.

Vanuatu

 Vanuatu has avoided coronavirus, but is currently facing a deadly tropical cyclone
Vanuatu has avoided coronavirus, but is currently facing a deadly tropical cycloneCredit: Getty Images – Getty

Vanuatu, 500m west of Fiji, welcomes visitors every year who come to enjoy deserted beaches and the mountainous terrain.

One of the most popular tourist attractions is Mount Yasur, a volcano constantly erupting but which can be climbed or even sand-boarded down.

While it hasn’t been affected by coronavirus, locals are currently facing huge destruction from category five Tropical Cyclone Harold.

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Solomon Islands

 The Solomon Islands were once the ground of fighting between the US and Japan during the war, leading to relics left behind
The Solomon Islands were once the ground of fighting between the US and Japan during the war, leading to relics left behindCredit: Getty Images – Getty

To the south-east of Papua New Guinea is the Solomon Islands.

Diving and swimming are popular activities but the islands also feature WWII relics following months of battles between Japan and the US following the attack on Pearl Harbour.

Now, people visit to stay in the jungle villages and lagoons, as well as go crocodile watching.

Tilos

 Tilos is just one of the few Greek islands to not report cases of coronavirus
Tilos is just one of the few Greek islands to not report cases of coronavirusCredit: Getty Images – Getty

Another Greek island to yet be faced with coronavirus, Tilos is the opposite of Santorini and remains relatively untouched by tourism.

The two villages on the island still have hotels, restaurants, and shops, run by the 500 locals who live there.

A ferry runs between Rhodes or Kos to the island, and is often visited for the day.

There are just nine countries which are still allowing British tourists to enter, with the majority of the world closing their borders and suspending flights.

We’ve also rounded up the most remote hotels in the world.

From Scotland to the US, many of them are hundreds of miles from the nearest towns.





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