Kristen Stewart arrives at the 76th edition of the Venice Film Festival. Picture: Arthur Mola/Invision/AP)

Kristen Stewart has arrived at the Venice Film Festival by water taxi ahead of the premiere of her new movie Seberg.

The political thriller directed by Benedict Andrews is inspired by the real-life story of American actress Jean Seberg and has been billed as one of the highlights of the film festival by excited film critics.

In the late 1960s, Seberg was targeted by the FBI through its illegal surveillance program, Cointelpro, in retaliation for her support of the Black Panther Party and her romantic involvement with civil rights activist Hakim Jamal.

Kristen cracks a peace sign for the cameras as she steps off the water taxi (Picture: AP)

As Kristen waits for the reactions from critics and festival VIPs after the film is screened on 30 August, it was business as usual for the former Twilight actress as she disembarked a private water taxi and made her way to a photocall with her entourage.

Dressed in a causal brown knitted jumper and cream chinos, the actress nailed dressed down chic as she steadied herself on terrafirme after stepping off the boat.

The actress looks smart but comfortable (Picture: AP)
You gotta love an outfit with pockets (Picture: AP)

On 29 August Kristen gave a press conference in Venice where she spoke about politics and how’s she’s not afraid to voice her opinion.

‘It’s not hard for me to wear my politics,’ she said when asked if political causes still need movie stars today.

‘It shows up in the work I do…In [public] conversations that I have…I like that interaction. I’m so lucky to have it!’

Anthony Mackie, Zazie Beetz, Kristen Stewart, Australian director Benedict Andrews, Jack OConnell and Margaret Qualley (Picture: AFP)
Kristen Stewart and Jack O’Connell, who plays the FBI agent who brings Joan Seberg down (Picture: Getty Images)

She also did an interview with Deadline magazine in which she spoke about how she enjoys tackling stories that don’t always have a happy ending.

‘There’s just something classically more existential and realistic in terms of what it feels like to actually live a life and have a brain and live amongst people that might have different ones rather than telling these compact perfect stories,’ she said.

She also revealed how she didn’t think much had changed between the political climate in the 60s and that of today.

‘I think this oppressive energy is so ironically the foundation of our politics now,’ Kristen added in the interview.

‘I mean, what was happening then is happening now and it’s gonna continue to happen. I mean, this is America and a bunch of dudes in power are never going to be cool with you taking it away — I don’t think they really care who they bowl over to maintain that.’



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