HEALTH NOTES: Michelle Obama gives followers the feel-good factor

A new study found that teenage girls who were exposed for six months to online images of professional women and their achievements were less anxious afterwards

A new study found that teenage girls who were exposed for six months to online images of professional women and their achievements were less anxious afterwards

Encouraging girls to follow inspirational women like Michelle Obama, right, on social media could help protect their mental health.

A new study found that teenage girls who were exposed for six months to online images of professional women and their achievements were less anxious afterwards.

Psychologist Terri Apter, from the University of Cambridge, who led the research, asked 28 girls aged 14 to 17 to pick four high-flying women from a list to follow online.

Before the study, most said they felt pressured by flawless images of models and celebrities on their social media feeds. 

Six months later, 90 per cent of the girls reported reduced feelings of anxiety, and spoke more positively about their career aspirations and hobbies.

Encouraging girls to follow inspirational women like Michelle Obama, right, on social media could help protect their mental health

Encouraging girls to follow inspirational women like Michelle Obama, right, on social media could help protect their mental health

Men who climb more than 35 flights of stairs every week are 16 per cent less likely to die prematurely from any illness than men climbing stairs fewer than ten times a week, according to a new study.

The claim comes from scientists at Sydney University, who tracked 9,000 men over 60 to see if there was a direct link between their lifespan and their use of stairs.

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