More than half of people say climate change will influence the way they vote in December’s general election, a survey has suggested.

The poll of more than 2,000 people for ClientEarth by Opinium found 54 per cent thought the issue would “greatly” or “somewhat” influence their decision on December 12.

Almost two thirds (63 per cent) also agreed politicians are not discussing climate change enough in the run up to the election, which was announced last night.

Against a backdrop of protests by Extinction Rebellion and school strikers calling for more urgent efforts to tackle rising temperatures, seven in 10 people also said the climate emergency demands more swift action.

ClientEarth lawyer Jonathan Church said: “From the student strikes to Extinction Rebellion, people across the UK are demanding greater action to address the climate crisis.

“Importantly these demands appear strong enough to make a difference at the next election.”

In addition, more than half thought the UK is already experiencing impacts of climate change including more extreme weather, hotter and longer heatwaves, sea level rises and storm surges, increased flooding, air pollution and species extinction.

However, it is unlikely climate change will lead the agenda during the next month-and-a-half of campaigning, with Brexit continuing to dominate the narrative surrounding the poll.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson told his MPs last night: “It’s time for the country to come together, get Brexit done and go forward.”

Additional reporting by PA.



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